Beth-shemesh

Beth-shemesh (Beth-sheh´mish; Heb., “house of sun”)

A name borne by four cities that appear to have been centers for a sun cult. 1 A city in the Valley of Sorek, sixteen miles southwest of Jerusalem, modern Tell er-Rumeileh (Ain Shems), on the highway to Ashdod and the Mediterranean. When the Ark of the Covenant was taken by the Philistines, it was finally returned to the people of Beth-shemesh (1Sam 6:1-16). Joash, king of Israel (800–785 BCE), captured Amaziah, king of Judah, at Beth-shemesh (2Kgs 14:11-14; 2Chr 25:21). During the war between Syria and Ephraim, the Philistines were able to get control once again of Beth-shemesh (2Chr 28:18). 2 A city mentioned in (Josh 19:22), south of the Sea of Galilee along the Jordan. 3 A town in the allotment of Naphtali (Josh 19:38). 4 A center for the sun cult in Egypt, possibly the Egyptian city On (Heliopolis).

1Sam 6:1-16

The Ark Returned to Israel
1The ark of the Lord was in the country of the Philistines seven months.2Then the Philistines called for the priests and the diviners ... View more

2Kgs 14:11-14

11But Amaziah would not listen. So King Jehoash of Israel went up; he and King Amaziah of Judah faced one another in battle at Beth-shemesh, which belongs to Ju ... View more

2Chr 25:21

21So King Joash of Israel went up; he and King Amaziah of Judah faced one another in battle at Beth-shemesh, which belongs to Judah.

2Chr 28:18

18And the Philistines had made raids on the cities in the Shephelah and the Negeb of Judah, and had taken Beth-shemesh, Aijalon, Gederoth, Soco with its village ... View more

Josh 19:22

22the boundary also touches Tabor, Shahazumah, and Beth-shemesh, and its boundary ends at the Jordan—sixteen towns with their villages.

Josh 19:38

38Iron, Migdal-el, Horem, Beth-anath, and Beth-shemesh—nineteen towns with their villages.

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